Oliewenhuis Art Museum

Temporary Exhibitions 2021

Exhibition:  32nd Annual Sophia Gray Memorial Exhibition: Presented by Lucien le Grange

Venue:  Oliewenhuis Art Museum, 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein

Date: 26 August – 26 September 2021

Sophia Gray (1814 –1871) was the first woman to practise architecture in South Africa and one of the earliest women in the world to do so. As a tribute to her achievements, the University of the Free State instituted the annual Sophia Gray Memorial Lecture and Exhibition in 1989 to recognise the contributions of a practising architect. This year’s lecture and exhibition is presented by Lucian le Grange.

Lucien graduated from the University of Cape Town in 1972. In 1975 he graduated from Rice University in Houston Texas (USA) with a Master Degree in Urban Design.

He joined the staff at the University of Cape Town School of Architecture in 1978 and remained there until 2011. He was Director of the School from 2005 until 2010. During his tenure at UCT Lucien taught Design and History and Theory of Architecture at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. He also published extensively on various topics, most famously conservation studies on Moravian Mission Stations in South Africa.

He established his practice in the early 1980s. After the change in dispensation in 1994 the practice grew considerably.

From its inception the practice has had an ethos of inclusivity and teaching. Many of Lucien’s students have continued to grow in the office, where teaching, discussion and debate are viewed as part of everyday practice.  Every project is approached with care and integrity. The practice is committed to good design that responds to the needs of the environment, the physical and social contexts, the people whom it serves and society at large.

 “We believe that good design needn’t be ostentatious or expensive, and that all of humanity has a right to a life of dignity and joy that good, well considered and informed, sensitive architecture and urban design can provide.”

The exhibition can be viewed either online via the link below or viewed in person at Oliewenhuis Art Museum from 27 August to 26 September 2021.

www.sophiagray.co.za/lecture-32

Oliewenhuis Art Museum is located at 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein and is open to the public from Monday to Friday between 08:00 and 17:00, and on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays between 09:00 and 16:00. Entrance is free and secure parking is available for visitors. A ramp at the entrance of the main entrance provides access for wheel chairs, while a lift provides access to the Permanent Collection display areas on the first floor.

For more information please contact Oliewenhuis Art Museum on 051 011 0525 (ext 200) or oliewen@nasmus.co.za.

Exhibition:  Containment: stitched aesthetics to cultural constraints

Venue:  Oliewenhuis Art Museum, 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein

Dates:  7 August – 28 November 2021

Containment: stitched aesthetics to cultural constraints

This exhibition aims to reflect on notions of cultural constraints, by utilising artworks from the Permanent Collection of Oliewenhuis Art Museum, and century old artifacts: garments (corsets, gloves and Chinese Lotus shoes) that are treasured at the National Museum’s History Department’s collection. The exhibition also mirror concepts such as a masquerade of femininity, femicide, and ‘stitched aesthetics’ by means of deceivingly beautiful garments like the corset that caused the body physical harm. A special focus are given to artists such as Leora Farber, Lebo Thoka, Majak Bredell, Nandipha Mntambo and Nomusa Makhubu.

Both the artworks and garments on display were handpicked to relate to physical pain and suffering the female body endured to fit a societal norm (from the early 1900’s until today), and is used as metaphors for the emotional pain and humiliation, that resulted in the pivotal moment in history where black females just had enough of the patronizing and derogative era of apartheid and marched in the streets of Pretoria demanding freedom.

For more information please contact Oliewenhuis Art Museum on 051 011 0525 (ext 200) or oliewen@nasmus.co.za.

Exhibition:  Life Line: Art in the time of COVID – PESP Projects

Venue:  Oliewenhuis Art Museum, 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein

Dates:  On show until 22 August 2021

Oliewenhuis Art Museum and Art Bank of South Africa (ArtBankSA) are celebrating the success of their Presidential Employment Stimulus Programmes (PESP) with an exhibition showcasing a selection of artworks from the ArtBankSA Banking with Art – Connecting Lives Art Bank Commissioning Programme and images of murals created for the Public Arts Programme – Towards a People’s Culture.

The Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme was a response to the clarion call by the Honourable President for job creation with a focus on youth, women, and people with disability towards economic recovery during the COVID-19 pandemic. The intention was for the Visual Arts sector to create temporary employment funded by the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture, between November 2020 and March 2021. The National Museum implemented three PESP programmes:

  • Banking with Art – Connecting Lives Art Bank Commissioning Programme

The Art Bank of South Africa in partnership with the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation (CCIFSA) invited 100 artists from all provinces to create artworks for potential inclusion into the ArtbankSA Contemporary Visual Art Collection. A selection of these contemporary artworks, now officially part of the ArtbankSA Collection forms part of the Life-Line: Art in the time of Covid-PESP Projects exhibition.  Included as part of the exhibition is a large woodcarving in the Sculpture Park, Sefate sa dipale tsa Africa / A tale about an African tree, carved by local woodcarvers, David Molapisi, Bernette Phalatsane, Kaizer Mafereka and Hartman Magasi.

Visit the ArtbankSA’s social media pages to learn more about the programme – @artbankSA

  • A Public Arts Programme – Towards A People’s Culture

The Oliewenhuis Art Museum recruited 92 young people from all over the Free State, to participate in the Free State Public Arts Programme, as part of the Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme. The programme aimed to popularize national symbols of our freedom and create national pride about these transformative elements of South Africa through a dedicated Public Art Murals programme. The Public Arts programme also raised awareness of social ills such as Gender Based Violence and the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as instilling community pride and nurturing a sense of place.  The project was managed by Oliewenhuis Art Museum in collaboration with artist and Art Coordinator, Marius Jansen van Vuuren. At the start of the project, workshops were arranged and presented by the Art Coordinator, in Mangaung (including Botshabelo, Thaba Nchu and Soutpan/Ikgomotseng), Ficksburg, Koffiefontein, Harrismith, Phuthaditjhaba and Welkom. Team leaders and their teams conceptualised, planned and secured sites for large murals before the physical painting of the murals commenced. The murals were created in-situ in busy public spaces, engaging commuters and local communities. Finally 21 murals were completed in all of the above mentioned areas, including two at Oliewenhuis Art Museum. 

Visit the Oliewenhuis and the Public Arts Programme’s social media pages to learn more:

@OliewenhuisArtMuseum @FSPublicArtsProgramme

  • Banking with Art – Connecting Lives Visual Art Graduate/Emerging Artist Placement Programme

The Art Bank of South Africa in partnership with the Visual Arts Network of South Africa (VANSA) provided the opportunity for visual arts organisations, galleries and individual mentors operating in the visual arts sector in all provinces to host 56 interns. This programme sought to place emerging visual artists and/or graduates with commercial galleries or visual arts institutions for up-skilling to undergo in-house training. As part of this programme six interns were appointed to complete an internship programme at Oliewenhuis Art Museum and ArtBankSA. The interns assisted in various tasks and activities at Oliewenhuis Art Museum and gained invaluable knowledge. They curated and installed an exceptional exhibition, HOME, as a collaborative project. The exhibition was on show in the Annex Gallery at Oliewenhuis Art Museum from 18 March – 9 May 2021.

The Bloemfontein based interns were Kamagelo Walaza, Puleng Rampone, Antoinette Strydom, Nkosana Mxakaza, Mamosa Lesenyeho and Julian Mentz also assisted with all aspects of the Public Art Programme.

Visit the Oliewenhuis and the Public Arts Programme’s social media pages to learn more:

@OliewenhuisArtMuseum @FSPublicArtsProgramme

The exhibition will be on show until 22 August 2021 at Oliewenhuis Art Museum, located on 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein.

For more information please contact Oliewenhuis Art Museum on 051 011 0525 (ext 200) or oliewen@nasmus.co.za.

 

Exhibition:The language of visual art: a curriculum based exhibition

Curated from the Permanent Collection of Oliewenhuis Art Museum

Venue: Annex Gallery, first floor at Oliewenhuis Art Museum, 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein

Dates:  26 July – 05 September 2021

The language of visual art is an exhibition based on the Grade 10 visual art curriculum with a special focus on the formal elements of art. The formal elements of art are seen as the building blocks of creating an artwork and consists of eight visual parts: line, form, shape, colour, texture, tonal value, space and movement.

A visually stimulating display from the Permanent Collection of Oliewenhuis Art Museum was curated to bring both enjoyment to the viewer while simultaneously educating them about crucial elements that make an artwork remarkable. An artist includes the visual elements in order to entice the viewer with visual clues, and this exhibition was based on that concept and spontaneously unfolded into an exciting, pleasurable exhibition.

The language of visual art represents South African artists and artworks from the Permanent Collection of Oliewenhuis Art Museum. This exhibition is an amalgamation of visual and tangible textures to be witnessed by the work of Adriaan de Villiers, the striking use of colour and expressionist mark making of Pauline Gutter, line, colour, concept and composition that is captured in the work of Lucky Sibiya, the portrayal of shape and space in the work of Sandile Goje and lastly tonal value, gray scale and perspective that is mastered by Ben Botma.

The remarkable aspect of this exhibition is that it speaks to a larger audience than just the Grade 10 learner. It is a visual celebration of artworks that is rarely on show. Being educated about the formal elements of art is not only for the school learner, but for any person that is interested to learn more about art.

Please book a guided tour for yourself, your learners or a group of friends. This is free of charge and we accommodate small groups according to the current Covid-19 lockdown level. For more information contact the Education Officer, Yolanda de Kock on yolanda@nasmus.co.za or call Oliewenhuis Art Museum at 051 0110 525 (ext 200).

Exhibition:  2020 Lockdown Art Quilts: An exhibition of quilts by members of the Oranje Quilters’ Guild

Venue:  Oliewenhuis Art Museum, 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein

Dates:  21 May – 20 June 2021

2020 Lockdown Art Quilts

An exhibition of quilts by members of the Oranje Quilters’ Guild

 Quilt art, sometimes known as art quilting, is an art form that uses both modern and traditional quilting techniques to create art objects. Practitioners of quilt art create it based on their experiences, imagery and ideas, rather than traditional patterns.

The selection of quilts was created by nine quilters from the Oranje Quilters’ Guild, the Free State Guild affiliated with the South African Quilters’ Guild. In February 2020, Iessie Steenberg, experienced quilter and lecturer at the Central University of Technology, Design and Studio Art, started presenting a quilters course that is mainly dedicated to the design and creation of art quilts. The group met in February and March, but with lockdown had to communicate via cell phones and computers.

The lessons comprising the course focused on art elements and principles. In each designed quilt, the quilter had to highlight how these were implemented in their design. Although art elements and principles are always present in any design to some extent, it was expected that quilters intentionally demonstrate the use of these elements and principles in their quilts. Other aspects of the course included themes and techniques appropriate to art quilting as well as ten different ways of finishing the edges of a quilt.

The group was able to meet again in October 2020 and was excited to show and share their creations in person. The exhibition will be on show from 21 May until 20 June 2021 on the first floor of Oliewenhuis Art Museum, located on 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein.

The visiting hours during Level 1 is from Monday to Friday between 09:00 and 15:00, Saturdays between 10:00 and 15:00 and closed on Sundays and public holidays. No member of the public is allowed in after 14:30. Entrance is free and secure parking is available for visitors. A ramp at the entrance of the main entrance provides access for wheel chairs, while a lift provides access to the Permanent Collection display areas on the first floor.

For more information please contact Oliewenhuis Art Museum on 051 011 0525 (ext 200) or oliewen@nasmus.co.za.

Oliewenhuis Art Museum

16 Harry Smith Street

Bloemfontein

T +27 (0) 51 011 0525 (ext 200)

oliewen@nasmus.co.za

www.nasmus.co.za
www.facebook.com/OliewenhuisArtMuseum
www.instagram.com/oliewenhuisartmuseum
www.twitter.com/Oliewenhuis
www.youtube.com/channel/UCKFVdvsMpo_QtRxwZ3XIJhg

Visiting Hours during Level 1:
Monday to Friday: 09h00 – 15h00
Saturday: 10h00 – 15h00
Closed on Sunday & Public Holidays

Please note:

The museum including the gardens, picnic spots and hiking trails close at 15:00. 

No member of the public is allowed in after 14:30. 

The changes to our daily operations were made to keep the health and safety of staff and visitors a top priority.

Oliewenhuis Art Museum is a satellite of the National Museum, Bloemfontein, an agency of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture

Exhibition:  Site, Materiality and Ritual; Constructively Engaging with Death and Loss A solo-exhibition by Adelheid von Maltitz

Venue: Oliewenhuis Art Museum, 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein

Dates: 13 May – 20 June 2021

Oliewenhuis Art Museum is proud to host a solo-exhibition by Bloemfontein based artist, Adelheid von Maltitz from 13 May to 20 June 2021. Adelheid is the current Academic Head of the Department of Fine Arts at the University of the Free State. She completed her Bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts in 2005, her Masters in Fine Arts in 2009 and is currently studying towards her PhD in Fine Arts at the same institution. She has participated in several local and international exhibitions and in 2014 was awarded the ‘runner up’ prize in Sasol New Signatures.

For Adelheid making sculpture and installation art involves processes that allow her to think and work through personal anxieties regarding the trauma of death and loss. Her interest in how her own art-making processes are comparable to conventional historical, as well as contemporary rituals which engage with death and loss, was sparked when she observed (what looked to her like) and mother and sister continually, over months, rebuild and maintain a roadside shrine which she passed regularly on her daily commute. By initially examining the nature of roadside shrines in relation to her own art-making processes, she realized that the roadside shrine and the mourning rituals associated with it, could be investigated as a heuristic device with which to tease out questions related to her own studio research. She was struck by the similarities in the ways in which death and loss may be engaged with constructively and in a healing manner, in art. The similarities that emerged are related to aspects of site, materiality and ritual. She was stimulated to examine art-making concerned with trauma and loss and with memorialisation and mourning practices, according to these three categories in historical and contemporary examples in order to illuminate her research questions.

Adelheid considers most of the materials she uses in her artworks as site-specific, either directly collected from a site of trauma and loss or attempting to reference that site. These site-specific materials include earth, cremated bones, hair, nail clippings, breastmilk and lint. The use of resin and Plexiglas is primarily to support these materials, and they also contribute meanings through their own material characteristics. She explains that she thinks of these site-specific materials as imbued with meaning and that she imagines the materials she uses, for example earth from Nazi concentration camps in Poland (the country where her grandfather was born and fled from during WWII) to have “witnessed’’ that death and loss. She further developed this imaginative thinking by means of particular processes when either re-working collected materials or creating new meaningfully imbued materials. These processes become ritual-like due to the structure she imposes on the way she collects and re-works the materials into her artworks. The ritualised actions of, for example, repetitive procedures of scattering, sprinkling, burning, pouring and grinding, and her working in specific places or at specific times, are all evocative. Moreover, there repetitive, place –or time- specific actions are enlivened by personal imaginative processes.

For Adelheid, even though she can imagine her way into something terrible like her own death or a family member’s death, her artwork, in all its various facets, allows her to engage with those thoughts and feelings and to some extend imagine a way out of it again. Her art making helps her be less paralysed and overcome, while it does not smooth over or hide realities. This ability to integrate the awareness of the certainly of death with the lush consciousness of continuation of life is after all what makes humans exceptional.

Oliewenhuis Art Museum is located at 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein. The visiting hours during Level 1 is from Monday to Friday between 09:00 and 15:00, Saturdays between 10:00 and 15:00 and closed on Sundays and public holidays. Entrance is free and secure parking is available for visitors and for buses. A ramp at the entrance of the main entrance provides access for wheel chairs, while a lift provides access to the Permanent Collection display areas on the first floor.

For more information please contact Oliewenhuis Art Museum on 051 011 0525 (ext 200) or oliewen@nasmus.co.za.

Click here to view the Exhibition Catalogue  

Exhibition:  Home: Legae, Lehae, Ekhaya, Home, Tuiste

Venue:  Oliewenhuis Art Museum: Annex Gallery, 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein

Dates:  18 March – 9 May 2021

Oliewenhuis Art Museum is excited to present a new exhibition titled, Home, conceived by the collective thoughts and concepts from a cohort of curators: the Interns of the Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme (PESP). This programme was made possible by the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture in partnership with VANSA, Oliewenhuis Art Museum and ArtBankSA. The compelling energy of this curation was birthed from a synergetic vibrancy amongst the curators, who form part of different histories, but have a common thread that is a home. The commonality of “home” and the fact that Oliewenhuis Art Museum was once a home (for the General Governor and family), really pays homage to the history of this space.

The home is a living space where different interactions occur such as eating, dreaming and receiving guests. This influenced the idea of Art Salons. Traditionally the word “salon” meant living room in French and the idea is that Home displays the thought processes and actions of a home as an Art Salon. The word “salon” is understood in the context of a gallery space, as an aesthetic style of decorations. It is a gallery arrangement that displays all mediums, sizes and textures of artwork on one wall and aims to excite and over-stimulate a viewer. This movement derives its title from French Salons that arose in the late seventeenth century. These French Salons became the first public displays for art.

As a group of curators, the Interns made a selection of artworks that offered them the opportunity to contextualise the aesthetic quality of their homes. With the exhibition it appears in various ways, not just by how homes are curated to look a particular way, but also to explain the various habits formulated and how we as humans collect things of sentimental value.  It becomes an obsessively personal observation of the unconscious acts of collecting things that holds meaning to the collector, ultimately evolving into an organic collection of clutter that can be likened to the Art Salon.

The theory for Home is an ideal characterisation of the globe reality depicting sites for everyday life that expose the complexities of social relations in homes. The exhibition creates, but also questions the synergy for a deeper meaning of a home within contemporary society and briefly entertains how a homogenised society would construct a home.

The artworks on display were selected from Oliewenhuis Art Museum’s Permanent Collection. Home features more than 70 artworks which showcase a diverse range of styles and media, including various photographic works and sculptures. Some of South Africa’s most prominent artists feature in this exhibition such as: Norman Catherine, Alexander Podlashuc, Marianne Podlashuc, Pauline Gutter,Walter Battis and Lucas Sithole, to name a few.

The exhibition will be on show in the Annex Gallery of Oliewenhuis Art Museum until 9 May 2021.

Oliewenhuis Art Museum is located at 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein. The visiting hours during Level 1 is from Monday to Friday between 09:00 and 15:00, Saturdays between 10:00 and 15:00 and closed on Sundays and public holidays. No member of the public is allowed in after 14:30. Entrance is free and secure parking is available for visitors. A ramp at the entrance of the main entrance provides access for wheel chairs, while a lift provides access to the Permanent Collection display areas on the first floor.

For more information please contact Oliewenhuis Art Museum on 051 011 0525 (ext 200) or oliewen@nasmus.co.za.

Click on here to view the Exhibition’s Education Leaflet

Click on here to view the artwork title booklet for all the artworks on show

Exhibition:  Tiro ya diatla: New Acquisitions of the Art Bank of South Africa Exhibition

Venue:  Oliewenhuis Art Museum, 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein

Dates:  11 March – 18 April 2021

Tiro ya diatla is a Setswana saying that loosely translates to; “That which is made by hands”.

By showcasing the varying skills and materials used by artists in creating this 2020 collection; Art Bank of South Africa (ArtbankSA) in partnership with Oliewenhuis Art Museum, seeks to celebrate the diverse application of traditional and contemporary artistic materials. The voices of the 62 featured artists make up the new acquisitions of ArtbankSA that exhibits various artworks from media such as paintings, drawings, sculpture, textile, and photography.

Throughout the history of art, artists have used their talents and skills to reflect society and the issues that they encounter. Tiro ya diatla is no different. The featured artists come from different regions of South Africa and their work expresses the contentious issues facing society today. Topics canvassed in this exhibition include; gender-based violence, religion, politics and the ongoing global efforts to curb the COVID-19 pandemic.

These artists use their creations to reflect and question their individual proclivities whilst engendering a notion of resilience and the spirit of humanity. They do this in the surroundings of a world that deals collectively with the adverse challenges of the pandemic. In doing this, the artists allow the viewer to reflect on his or her own experiences during this unprecedented time.

The notion that artists mirror society, can ring true through the work of Vuyisile Adoons, entitled Social Distancing. This work depicts two men playing a game of Morabaraba while maintaining social distancing and wearing masks. This is a reflection of our current times. Some of the featured artists include; Thandiwe Msebenzi, David Paton Murray, Lizo Pemba, Alet Pretorius,  Gabrielle Raaff, Mothobi Mefane, Thalente Khomo, Mandisa Buthelezi, Pierre Cloete, Happy Dhlame, Abrie Fourie, King Debs, Collen Maswanganyi, Cow Mashilo, Mfundo Joseph Mbali and Bulumko Mbethe.

About the Art Bank of South Africa

The Art Bank of South Africa (ArtbankSA) is a national programme of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture as part of the Mzansi Golden Economy (MGE) strategy implementation.  ArtbankSA is hosted by the National Museum, Bloemfontein, an agency of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture. Its vision is to promote, foster and stimulate a vibrant market for the collection of South African contemporary visual art.

ArtbankSA is achieving this through curating a definitive collection of contemporary South African visual art and promoting financial sustainability for the artists. This will be done through the leasing and selling of artworks, nurturing emerging South African artists by expanding the market for their work and providing skills development opportunities and fostering an appreciation for contemporary art by making art accessible to the broader public in their workplaces, shared spaces and homes.

Through the exhibitions that ArtbankSA curates we seek to receive feedback from the different members of society to reflect the work of the project.

Oliewenhuis Art Museum is located at 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein. The visiting hours during Level 1 is from Monday to Friday between 09:00 and 15:00, Saturdays between 10:00 and 15:00 and closed on Sundays and public holidays. No member of the public is allowed in after 14:30. Entrance is free and secure parking is available for visitors. A ramp at the entrance of the main entrance provides access for wheel chairs, while a lift provides access to the Permanent Collection display areas on the first floor.

For more information please contact Oliewenhuis Art Museum on 051 011 0525 (ext 200) or oliewen@nasmus.co.za. For more information on the Art Bank of South Africa, please contact Nathi Gumede on 051 447 9609 or nathi@artbanksa.org

Oliewenhuis Art Museum

16 Harry Smith Street

Bloemfontein

T +27 (0) 51 011 0525 (ext 200)

oliewen@nasmus.co.za

www.nasmus.co.za
www.facebook.com/OliewenhuisArtMuseum
www.instagram.com/oliewenhuisartmuseum
www.twitter.com/Oliewenhuis
www.youtube.com/channel/UCKFVdvsMpo_QtRxwZ3XIJhg

Visiting Hours during Level 1:
Monday to Friday: 09h00 – 15h00
Saturday: 10h00 – 15h00
Closed on Sunday & Public Holidays

Please note:

The museum including the gardens, picnic spots and hiking trails close at 15:00. 

No member of the public is allowed in after 14:30 pm.

The changes to our daily operations were made to keep the health and safety of staff and visitors a top priority.

Oliewenhuis Art Museum is a satellite of the National Museum, Bloemfontein, an agency of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture

Click on here to view the Education Leaflet

Click on here to view the Art Bank of South Africa – Nurturing emerging South African artists Leaflet

Temporary Exhibitions 2020

Exhibition:  The Don Quixote Portfolio
Venue:  Annex Gallery, Oliewenhuis Art Museum, 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein
Dates:  10 December 2020 to 21 February 2021

Oliewenhuis Art Museum is pleased to announce that a recent donation, The Don Quixote Portfolio, will be on exhibition from 10 December 2020 to 21 February 2021. The portfolio was inspired by Spanish writer Miguel de Cervantes’ novel ‘Don Quixote’ published in two parts – part 1 in 1605 and part 2 in 1615. Illustrating selected quotations from Cervantes’ novel, which appear as printed sheets in the portfolio, it features the work of 16 artists and was printed at Atelier le Grand Village.

Atelier le Grand Village is a lithography studio located in the hamlet ‘le Grand Village’ in the Charente-Limousine area, in the south-west of France.  The founder, Francis van der Riet, was born and grew up in the Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe.  He studied in Cape Town and has lived in France since 1988. The aim of the studio is to revive the art of lithography by inviting artists in residence from around the world.

Well known South African artists, namely, Diane Victor, Bambo Sibiya, Willem Boshoff, Jan Vermeiren, Leon de Bliquy, Christiaan Diedericks, and Pauline Gutter have printed at Atelier le Grand Village and contributed to the portfolio.  Other South African artists that printed at the studio includes Mongezi Ncaphayi, Banele Khoza, Hanneke Benade and Themba Khumalo. The following international artists contributed to the portfolio: Michael Barnes, Sasha Bitzer, Corrine Forget, Anne-Catherine Charbonnier, NINA Kovacheva, Patrice Lefèvre, Valentin Stefanoff, Suzanne Touvay and Francis van der Riet.

The Quixote / Quichotte Portfolio was one of the first group projects of the studio.  The idea was for a collection of artists that had previous residencies at the studio, to contribute to this portfolio, with the aim of showcasing the richness of lithography as a printing technique. It also shows how artists personalise the technique, resulting in a rich variety of styles.  The portfolio of 16 artworks, 39cm (h) x 36 cm (w) took around 5 years to complete. 

From the start it was agreed with the artists that each would receive one edition of the portfolio and that the studio would donate editions to institutions in the countries where the artists came from.  As the majority of the artists are South African, it seemed fair and appropriate to donate an edition to two institutions in South Africa.  Atelier le Grand Village have already donated one edition to the Iziko South African National Gallery.  Willem Boshoff suggested that the studio approach Oliewenhuis Art Museum, and the Advisory Committee gladly approved an edition to be accepted into the Permanent Collection. It was a wonderful opportunity to expand the collection and is in line with Oliewenhuis Art Museum’s objectives for the collection which include; ‘To collect, document, conserve and research works of art acquired through purchase, commission, bequest and donation.’

Editions were also donated to the following collections: Bibliothèque Nationale de France,

Victoria and Albert Museum, London and the Albertina collection, Vienna.

Oliewenhuis Art Museum is located at 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein. The visiting hours during Level 1 is from Monday to Friday between 09:00 and 15:00, Saturdays between 10:00 and 15:00 and closed on Sundays and public holidays. Entrance is free and secure parking is available for visitors. A ramp at the entrance of the main entrance provides access for wheel chairs, while a lift provides access to the Permanent Collection display areas on the first floor.

For more information on Oliewenhuis Art Museum please contact the Museum at 051 011 0525 (ext 200) or oliewen@nasmus.co.za. Stay up to date by following Oliewenhuis Art Museum on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for all upcoming exhibitions and events.

For more information on Atelier le Grand Village please visit www.legrandvillage.net and follow all the happenings at the studio on Instagram (@atelierlegrandvillage).

Click on here to view the catalogue

Oliewenhuis Art Museum is please to present:

Creatively Contrasted:  New views on the Permanent Collection

30 September – 15 November 2020

Creatively Contrasted: New views on the Permanent Collection is a curated exhibition from the Permanent Collection housed at Oliewenhuis Art Museum, specifically created in celebration of Heritage Day celebrated on 24 September. The Permanent Collection is an outstanding collection of South African art. It has a solid foundation of early South African artists and continually expands on its collection of works by contemporary South African artists.

By selecting artworks by contrasting interesting aspects such as the oldest and the most recently created artwork in the collection, the exhibition aims to give a fresh perspective on the collection. The exhibition highlights the incredible variety of heritage objects that it comprise and pays tribute to the incredible richness of South African visual art.

The exhibition is made virtual for all to enjoy until the museum opens to the public, and then visitors will be able to enjoy and experience the exhibition at Oliewenhuis Art Museum.  

View the virtual exhibition here:

View Catalogue

Download Catalogue

Temporary Exhibitions 2019

Esther Mahlangu invitations.cdr

Exhibition: TIMELESS – Between Matter & Spirit, a solo exhibition by artist Dr Esther Mahlangu

Venue: Main Building, Oliewenhuis Art Museum, 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein

Opening: 18:00 on Thursday, 23 May 2019

Informal Walkabout: 10:00 on Friday, 24 May 2019

Dates: 23 May – 23 June 2019

Africa’s diverse cultural heritage and dignity is uniquely celebrated by the work and life-long commitment of artist and global Ndebele cultural icon, Dr Esther Mahlangu. Art curator and writer, Beathur Mgoza Baker reflects on how: “Her life defies chronology and her talent, defies the conventions of the Western art as a truly African articulation of our collective cultural heritage”. In South Africa we embrace her as a national treasure, a wise elder and passionate, committed ambassador who has captivated the interest and imagination of the world with her gift, and her beautiful understanding of how art is central to our cultural identity as human beings. Even at the age of eighty three the iconic artist still continues producing work and creative interpretations of the sacred geometry and practices of Ndebele and African culture.

A selection of her artworks and heavily beaded blankets in celebration of the artist and Africa month is on show in the Main Building of the Art Museum.

Harmonia inivitation

Exhibition: Harmonia: Sacred Geometry, the pattern of existence by Gordon Froud

 Venue: Reservoir, Oliewenhuis Art Museum, 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein

Opening: 19:00 on Thursday, 16 May 2019

Opening speaker: Adelheid von Maltitz, Lecturer and acting Academic Head of the Department of Fine Arts at the University of the Free State

Informal Walkabout: 10:00 on Friday, 17 May 2019

Dates: 16 May – 23 June 2019

Harmonia: Sacred Geometry, the pattern of existence by Gordon Froud

“Geometry is widely held to be the universal plan on which all material existence is based. The patterns of proportion, shape, form and numbers are found in the smallest atomic structures and are perpetuated at every level of existence even as far as a pattern for the expanding universe in which we live. Most belief systems acknowledge geometry as a plan; blueprint or map on/through, which matter, has come into being. This has variously been described as the thoughts of God, divine utterances, proof of a creator, a master-plan and so on. In its application geometry (Greek for earth – geo and meter for measurement) it is thus often imbued with notions of the divine or the sacred referring to a creator or God or energy force.” Gordon Froud 2018

Gordon Froud, well-known sculptor, Senior Lecturer in sculpture at University of Johannesburg and curator is presenting a new body of work that investigates various aspects of sacred geometry in the world around us. His cone virus sculptures (pointed polyhedra) have become iconic in the cities and towns of Johannesburg, Pretoria, and Stellenbosch and most recently in Richmond in the Eastern Cape on rooftops, in parks and on the streets. Having featured steel mesh geometric sculptures at Nirox Sculpture Park, Hermanus Fyn Arts festivals, Boschendal and Almenkerk wine estates, Froud has constructed a show that brings his research into focus for a monumental mid-career show at the esteemed Standard Bank Gallery in Johannesburg. This show has since travelled to Cavalli Equestrian Estate Gallery in Somerset West, KKNK festival, Oudtshoorn and will be on show at Oliewenhuis Art Museum from 16 May – 23 June 2019.

This show, however, extends to more than his sculptural works and includes drawing, printmaking, digital imaging, embossing and even animation. Froud looks at sacred geometry in the landscape, the cityscape, in the human form and in the spirit. Each of these chapters reinforces the proliferation and extent to which geometry is inherent to our existence and to the overall pattern of the universe. His exploration of the spiritual is not partisan (as he does not ascribe to a particular belief system himself) but looks at sacred geometry in most belief systems from ancient Egypt, Mayan temples, Judeao-Christian, Muslim and other beliefs, to contemporary beliefs in alien and inter-dimensionality of beings, crop circles and the like.

This extensive body of work (over 100 pieces) ranges from small-scale crystal glass works to a monumental 6.5m high polyhedron made from 18 giant road cones – manufactured and sponsored by Sinvac Plastics in Pretoria. An extensive catalogue was published and serve as a contextual retrospective of Froud’s 35 year career so far. The catalogue includes interviews, academic articles and an in depth chapter by Froud on the work for this exhibition.

Harmonia: Sacred Geometry, the pattern of existence will be opened by Adelheid von Maltitz,

Lecturer and acting Academic Head of the Department of Fine Arts at the University of the Free State at 19:00 on Thursday, 16 May 2019 in the Reservoir, Oliewenhuis Art Museum.

A walkabout of the exhibition will be conducted by the artist at 10:00 on Friday, 17 May 2019.

Attendance of both the opening and walkabout events are open to the public to attend and free of charge. Oliewenhuis Art Museum is located at 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein and is open from Monday to Friday between 08:00 and 17:00, and on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays between 09:00 and 16:00.

For more information please contact Oliewenhuis Art Museum on 051 011 0525 (ext 200) or oliewen@nasmus.co.za.

Basotho Blankets

Basotho Blankets Exhibition

Dates: 10/05/2019 – 23/06/2019

Venue: Oliewenhuis Art Museum (Annex)

The anthropology collection of the National Museum houses a large collection of Basotho blankets. Most are part of the Robertson collection, on loan from Neil Robertson’s family. Neil Robertson was a third-generation tradesman in Basotho blankets, the grandson of Charles Hendry Robertson. A large number of these blankets will be on display at Oliewenhuis Art Museum until 23 June 2019.

What makes this collection of blankets unique is the time span over which it was collected. The collection includes a Sandringham mountain rug or Mohodu dating back to 1934, a Badges of the brave blanket honouring those who fought during World War II (1939-1945) as well as a Batho ba Roma blanket made to commemorate Pope John Paul’s visit to Lesotho in 1988. But certainly the most prestigious blanket in the collection is the Victoria England / Seanamarena or ‘chief’s blanket’. All of the above-mentioned blankets will also form part of the exhibition.

10th SAQG Travelling Exhibition of Quilts

10th SAQG Travelling Exhibition of Quilts

Dates: 12/04/2019 – 05/05/2019 

Venue: Oliewenhuis Art Museum (Annex)

The quilts on exhibition were selected from entries in the Siyadala Competition and were chosen to inspire and educate the viewers about the different styles and techniques, colours and designs used to create this collection of quilts.

This collection under the title ‘We Create’ has travelled across the country to various destinations and regions and will conclude at the SA National Quilt Festival in Midrand in September 2019. The opportunity to admire and see the talent and creativity of South African Quilters is not to be missed.

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